On the occasion of the opening of a new exhibition in the National Towage Museum at Maassluis a large number of guests had gathered last Saturday in one of the halls of Shipyard De Haas in this town.

The chairman of the museum, Mr. Karel Kaffa, expressed his gratitude to Mr. Govert de Haas for setting spontaneously one of the shipbuilding halls of his yard at the disposal of the museum for the opening ceremony. The title of the exhibition is "Towage from IJ to the IJ-mouth". Mr. Kaffa memorized that the subject once again was a serious challenge to the compilers of the exhibition and the volunteers of the museum. Throughout the years more than 45 towage companies have owned tugs that were active around the North Sea Canal from IJmuiden to Amsterdam. The exhibition shows the visitors to the museum that towage has been of great importance for the development of the Dutch industry in general and of course also for the Amsterdam region.

The next speaker was Mr. Govert de Haas, managing director of the shipyard. He told the audience that his yard not only built and repaired tugs, but also patrol vessels for Rijkswaterstaat, pilot- and customsships as well as police patrolvessels. For him it was an honour to receive the guests of the museum being the first visitors to the new exhibition.

Mr. Cor Oudendijk, former harbourmaster of the port of Amsterdam and nowadays chairman of the Sea- and Harbourmuseum of IJmuiden, was invited to perform the actual openingceremony. First of all he went into the history of the North Sea Canal and its development. The various tugs that sailed on the canal illustrate perfectly the development of towage from the early paddle tugboats to the present compact and advanced bruisers operating in the canal and its locks. A few towage companies survived during the course of the years and new ones settled along the canal, illustrating the progress of the branch.

Mr. David van der Houwen, culture alderman of Maassluis and replacing at the same time the burgomaster of Maassluis (who was this morning very busy with preparations for the reception of some 300 Middle East refugees in the local sports hall) turned out to be very proud of the towage museum. It seemed to him that each exhibition was more impressive than its predecessor. He very properly observed that Maassluis is the towage town of the Netherlands.

The last speaker in the hall was Mr. Hans de Klerk. He agreed that indeed compiling this exhibition was quite a challenge. Everybody knows that there were, and still are, some towage companies along the North Sea Canal, however he was surprised by the large number. ( 47!) Not all companies could be remembered in this exhibition. That's why a choice was made to show the history of quite a number of contributing companies. An accompanying illustrated booklet of no less than 36 pages, written by Mr. J. van Haarlem, tells lots of particulars of a great number of towage companies in the Amsterdan and IJmuiden region. Mr. De Klerk also expressed his gratitude not only for the cooperation of the companies involved, but also for the important support of the Baggermuseum (Dredging Museum). The material that was used for dredging the canal in the early days is showed in pictures and shipmodels, placed at the disposal of the Maassluis museum by the Baggermuseum at Sliedrecht.

Of course Mr. Karel Kaffa handed over flowers to some of the ladies in the audience after which the guests took a five minutes' walk to the museum. In the entrance of the museum Mr. Cor Oudendijk was invited to ring the bell, after which the exhibition "From IJ to IJmond" officially was declared open. While having a festive drink quite a crowd took the time to watch the photos, curiosities and shipmodels. Some of the visitors congratulated the volunteers of the museum with their fine work to keep up the excellent reputation of the museum. Until 8th May next year visitors interested in the special subject of the North Sea Canal are more than welcome in Maassluis. No doubt they will also enjoy the towage atmosphere and the explanation of the history of Dutch towage in general in the other rooms of the museum.

(Translated by Nico Ouwehand; Photo's: National Dutch Towage Museum NSM)

On the occasion of the opening of a new exhibition in the National Towage Museum at Maassluis a large number of guests had gathered last Saturday in one of the halls of Shipyard De Haas in this town.

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The chairman of the museum, Mr. Karel Kaffa, expressed his gratitude to Mr. Govert de Haas for setting spontaneously one of the shipbuilding halls of his yard at the disposal of the museum for the opening ceremony. The title of the exhibition is "Towage from IJ to the IJ-mouth". Mr. Kaffa memorized that the subject once again was a serious challenge to the compilers of the exhibition and the volunteers of the museum. Throughout the years more than 45 towage companies have owned tugs that were active around the North Sea Canal from IJmuiden to Amsterdam. The exhibition shows the visitors to the museum that towage has been of great importance for the development of the Dutch industry in general and of course also for the Amsterdam region.

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The next speaker was Mr. Govert de Haas, managing director of the shipyard. He told the audience that his yard not only built and repaired tugs, but also patrol vessels for Rijkswaterstaat, pilot- and customsships as well as police patrolvessels. For him it was an honour to receive the guests of the museum being the first visitors to the new exhibition.

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Mr. Cor Oudendijk, former harbourmaster of the port of Amsterdam and nowadays chairman of the Sea- and Harbourmuseum of IJmuiden, was invited to perform the actual openingceremony. First of all he went into the history of the North Sea Canal and its development. The various tugs that sailed on the canal illustrate perfectly the development of towage from the early paddle tugboats to the present compact and advanced bruisers operating in the canal and its locks. A few towage companies survived during the course of the years and new ones settled along the canal, illustrating the progress of the branch.

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Mr. David van der Houwen, culture alderman of Maassluis and replacing at the same time the burgomaster of Maassluis (who was this morning very busy with preparations for the reception of some 300 Middle East refugees in the local sports hall) turned out to be very proud of the towage museum. It seemed to him that each exhibition was more impressive than its predecessor. He very properly observed that Maassluis is the towage town of the Netherlands.

\r\n

The last speaker in the hall was Mr. Hans de Klerk. He agreed that indeed compiling this exhibition was quite a challenge. Everybody knows that there were, and still are, some towage companies along the North Sea Canal, however he was surprised by the large number. ( 47!) Not all companies could be remembered in this exhibition. That's why a choice was made to show the history of quite a number of contributing companies. An accompanying illustrated booklet of no less than 36 pages, written by Mr. J. van Haarlem, tells lots of particulars of a great number of towage companies in the Amsterdan and IJmuiden region. Mr. De Klerk also expressed his gratitude not only for the cooperation of the companies involved, but also for the important support of the Baggermuseum (Dredging Museum). The material that was used for dredging the canal in the early days is showed in pictures and shipmodels, placed at the disposal of the Maassluis museum by the Baggermuseum at Sliedrecht.

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Of course Mr. Karel Kaffa handed over flowers to some of the ladies in the audience after which the guests took a five minutes' walk to the museum. In the entrance of the museum Mr. Cor Oudendijk was invited to ring the bell, after which the exhibition "From IJ to IJmond" officially was declared open. While having a festive drink quite a crowd took the time to watch the photos, curiosities and shipmodels. Some of the visitors congratulated the volunteers of the museum with their fine work to keep up the excellent reputation of the museum. Until 8th May next year visitors interested in the special subject of the North Sea Canal are more than welcome in Maassluis. No doubt they will also enjoy the towage atmosphere and the explanation of the history of Dutch towage in general in the other rooms of the museum.

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The address is: Hoogstraat 1-3, 3142 EA Maassluis. Don't forget to visit also the website: www.nationaalsleepvaartmuseum.nl

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(Translated by Nico Ouwehand; Photo's: National Dutch Towage Museum NSM)

The new building tug Svitzer Amstel (Imo 9771133) has departed from the Sanmar Shipyard as Bogacay XII, bound for Amsterdam/IJmuiden were she will operated by Port Towage Amsterdam (PTA). She is sailing under her own power and is expected to be arrived on the 28th of September.

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The tug is designed by distinguished Canadian naval architects, Robert Allan Ltd, the relatively new exclusive Bogacay model is based on Ramparts 2400SX series exclusively developed for Sanmar Shipyard. The vessel measures 24.4m x 11.25m with a 60 tonne bollard pull derived from a pair of 3512 C Caterpillar engines, each developing 1,765kW at 1,800 rev/min. connected to Rolls Royce azimuthing thrusters of US 205 FP type. She is Malta registered with call sign 9HA4058 has a grt of 290 tons and is classed American Bureau of Shipping.

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Svitzer has a fleet of 5 tugs serving in Amsterdam operated by Port Towage Amsterdam BV (PTA), a JV company owned equally by Svitzer and Iskes Towage. Since 1833, Svitzer has provided safety and support at sea. With 4,000 employees, a fleet of more than 400 vessels and operations all over the world, Svitzer is the global market leader within towage and emergency response.

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"Given the varying tug requirements in Amsterdam depending on water depths and different areas of the port inside and outside the locks, Svitzer Amstel is a welcome addition to our diverse fleet strengthening our service capability and reliability. With 60 tons bollard pull, Svitzer Amstel has been ordered and built ready to serve the needs of the Port of Amsterdam." says Rick Broersma, managing director Continental Europe for Svitzer Europe.

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Sanmar has delivered two sister vessels to Svitzer in 2014 named as Bogacay II and Svitzer Tyne.

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At the end of August 2015, Svitzer has also signed a newbuilding contract with Sanmar Shipyard for construction of six vessels, with delivery of the first one to be expected in Q4 2016. The vessels are 70 tonne bollard pull RAstar 2800-E Class ASD tugs being built to fulfil for Svitzer's commitment to current and upcoming new contracts in various terminal towage markets.

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(Source: Svitzer)

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'From IJ to IJmond' is the theme of the new exhibition of the Dutch National Towage Museum in Maassluis, The Netherlands. The exhibition will be opened on Saturday September 19th by Mr. Cor Oudendijk, former harbour master of the Port of Amsterdam and former salvage master of Wijsmuller. At the opening ceremony many prominent officers from the towage and the Amsterdam port community will be present. Afterwards it is possible to visit the exhibition.

The new exhibition gives a vivid overview of the history and the present-day towage industry in Amsterdam and about. The geographical position of the port of Amsterdam necessitates tug assistance for seagoing ships for centuries. In that period there has been a huge development in technique and organisation of tug assistance. Tugs provide towing services in the harbour basins, on the North Sea Channel and roads whereas in the old days, tugs ventured out as far as the English Channel. With the advent of steam propulsion, tugs were not only working locally but expanded their work area to the Zaan and made towage trips from Amsterdam to all parts of The Netherlands. The fishing industry in IJmuiden led to a towage activity with an own nature. The narrow canals in Amsterdam with their many low bridges created a unique type of tug: the "Amsterdammertje". Of this type many are still sailing commercially or as pleasure craft.

Competition has always been present. Tug companies emerged, ended, merged or were taken over. The most recent development in this respect is the cooperation of Svitzer and Iskes in "Amsterdam Port Towage".

Family businesses have been predominant for a long time. Familiar names from the past are Goedkoop, Wijsmuller and Zur Mühlen. Nowadays, these are Blom, Amstel en IJ, and Heida who are mainly operating on the city canals. In addition, the large Amsterdam deep sea shipping companies and shipyards owned their own tugs.

Economy of scale and high investments make towage assistance to seagoing ships nowadays the realm of the big shipping companies such as Svitzer and Iskes who operate tugs of over 7200 HP power. By comparison, in 1841, the first tug on the North Hollands Canal had an output of just 60HP.

Svitzer Marken02The history of the many companies, tugs and events from the larger Amsterdam port area are illustrated in the exhibition with beautiful ship models, unique photos, documents and attributes. The Museum has also a large permanent exposition. Furthermore, the museum has a new interactive multimedia system which can be used by the visitors for searches themselves. The museum archives contain thousands of photos, documents and objects that can be researched upon appointment.

Illustrative of this dynamic exhibition are the accompanying photographs of the first tug (above) and one of the newest in the IJmond area (next).

The exhibition 'From IJ to IJmond' can be visited from September 19th 2015 – May 8th 2016,
Tuesday – Sunday from 13.30 until 16.30 hrs.

For further information please contact:
Maarten Helwig, mbl 06 - 3300 8733, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or:
Stichting Nationaal Sleepvaart Museum,
Hoogstraat 1-3,3142 EA Maassluis,
+31 (0)10-5912474, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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